Eye Surgery in Adrian, MI Helps People with Cataracts

Many people develop cataracts after the age of 50. A cataract is a clouding of the eyes’ lenses that leads to vision loss. It cannot be corrected with glasses, corneal refractive surgery (LASIK), or contact lenses. However, modern eye surgery in Adrian, MI that is directed to cataracts can bring relief for cataract patients. This type of surgery frequently reduces a patient’s dependence on eyeglasses as well.

Cataracts Are a Prevailing Problem

Most cataracts are related to the aging process. According to the National Eye Institute (NEI), almost 69% of people in the US aged 80 and over had cataracts in 2010. Plus, the prevalence of the condition is anticipated to grow substantially in the future. For instance, in 2010, roughly 24 million Americans were diagnosed with cataracts and had to have eye surgery. That number is expected to grow to around 50 million by 2050, according to the NEI.

What Happens During Surgery

Fortunately, modern cataract eye surgery featured on such sites as  makes it possible for older Americans to see even better than before. During the procedure, the lens inside the eye is removed and replaced with an intraocular lens or IOL. The IOL restores clear vision to the eye.

Cataract Candidates

The best candidates for this type of eye surgery experience blurred vision, light sensitivity, clouded vision, and the dimming of colors. It takes about 15 minutes to have the procedure performed and recovery takes about a month. Surgeries are usually performed on an outpatient basis, which means an overnight stay in a hospital is not necessary.

Phacoemulsification

Most contemporary cataract procedures entail the use of a high-frequency ultrasound device. The equipment is used to break up the cloudy lens into small pieces. The pieces are then removed from inside the eye by a suction device. This process in known as phacoemulsification (phaco), and is performed by making smaller incisions than what were previously made for the removal of cataracts. As a result, patients experience faster healing and a reduction in complications such as retinal detachment.

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